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Experience the art & science of heart care.
When hearts get Better, it's a thing of beauty.

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A Grateful
Heart

Jon Flaming
+
Tim Gallagher

Lifesaving heart transplant. Lifegiving impact.

The Art

After experiencing a widowmaker heart attack in his own home, Tim needed a heart transplant. Quick action by his family and our medical team, along with the right donor organ, saved his life.

When Jon Flaming spoke with Tim, he was inspired by Tim's gratitude for the quick, expert care he received. Putting brush to canvas, Jon illustrated the magnitude of the donor's gift and the care that our team delivers to every grateful heart we're honored to serve.

The Science

Heart transplants are not customary for most heart attack victims, but with Tim's condition rapidly deteriorating, his wife asked our care team for a second opinion. Tim was transported to Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, where our team confirmed he needed a new heart.

Due to a typically shorter wait time for our transplant patients, we were able to provide the right donor heart for Tim at the right time. Tim knows he was lucky. And today, his mission is to spread awareness about heart disease and the importance of a healthy lifestyle.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Legacy

Giovanni Valderas
+
Kay Nell Harris

Minimally invasive heart surgery. Major benefits.

The Art

When we detected a problem with Kay's heart through medical tests, we helped her find the right solution. She received TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement), a minimally invasive alternative to open heart surgery. She was out of the hospital and back home the next day.

When Giovanni Valderas spoke with Kay, he was drawn to her warm-hearted nature and connection to family. He sculpted a magnolia, Kay's favorite tree, using reclaimed wood to show how roots take hold around the human heart and give it life.

The Science

TAVR, which replaces the main heart valve with an artificial valve, is available to a wide range of patients today. Innovative therapies like TAVR are introduced through clinical trials, where researchers evaluate a new treatment against the standard treatment. When Kay needed the procedure, it was still in clinical trials.

Traditional open heart surgery typically lasts 4 hours with a 7-day hospital stay, while TAVR lasts 30-45 minutes and patients often go home the next day. Since the first clinical trials in 2007, we've been national leaders in TAVR. Our commitment to research is just one of the ways we provide innovative care for patients. Kay was thrilled to receive this minimally invasive treatment and quickly get back to what she loves.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Precision

Raynor Bearden
+
Elizabeth Turner

Irregular heartbeat. Elevated heart care.

The Art

When Elizabeth’s smartwatch detected an irregular heart rate, her doctor detected something bigger: a serious heart condition known as atrial fibrillation (AFib). Early diagnosis helped us provide Elizabeth with a minimally invasive surgery that corrected her irregular heartbeat and helped her get back to the activities she loves.

Raynor Bearden, inspired by Elizabeth’s vibrant nature, used a meticulous cross-hatching technique that mimics the marks of treatment for AFib. Raynor created 16 different hearts to mirror the number of app icons on Elizabeth’s smartwatch while also illustrating how every heart we treat is unique.

The Science

People with AFib might experience a number of symptoms, including a rapid heart rate, shortness of breath and fatigue. It’s important to get treatment for AFib, which comes with an increased risk of stroke. During treatment, we put lines of scar tissue into Elizabeth’s heart, similar to a cornfield maze. This caused the electrical system of her heart to correct, helping her get out of AFib and off medication.

Elizabeth’s symptoms of AFib are long gone, and so is her likelihood of a stroke. She credits her care team for helping her quickly get back to dancing, an activity dear to her heart.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Continuum

Gil Bruvel
+
Bob Torti

Heart disease halted. Recovery enhanced.

The Art

Despite having no symptoms of heart disease, Bob decided to get a CT scan of his heart. The test revealed an aortic aneurysm, a serious heart condition that can be fatal if it ruptures. We repaired Bob’s aneurysm and enhanced his recovery with a cardiac rehab plan. After treatment, Bob was so energized that he came out of retirement to begin a new job that he loves.

Gil Bruvel, inspired by Bob’s determination to regain his health, created an angelic figure that represents our team’s commitment to Bob’s recovery. Gil used pixelated pieces of wood and color to represent the growth of recovery and the rejuvenation of life.

The Science

A calcium score screening detects build-up in the coronary arteries that could increase your risk of a heart attack. Depending on your test results, your doctor might suggest medication or lifestyle changes.

After repairing Bob’s aortic aneurysm, we enrolled him in our cardiac rehabilitation program. Cardiac rehabilitation typically lasts 12 weeks, with medically supervised sessions that cover lifestyle changes in exercise, nutrition, stress management and smoking cessation. Bob eagerly embraced participation in the program, incorporating real-life strategies into his recovery to gain the confidence needed to get back on his feet.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Heart + Life

Arthur James
+
Carlos Hernandez

Heart disease halted. Recovery enhanced.

The Art

When Carlos started feeling short of breath, it was time to find a longtime solution. We replaced his aortic valve, which was leaking badly, and helped renew his zest for life. Carlos, who has lived in many states but calls Texas home, is now back to work, spending time with family and enjoying newfound energy.

Arthur James, inspired by the many treasures Carlos keeps in his heart, collected unique elements and symbols to create a mosaic of his restoration and renewal.

The Science

The main test for diagnosing heart valve diseases is an echocardiogram (echo)—an ultrasound that helps your care team evaluate how well your heart is pumping.

We replaced Carlos’ main heart valve with an artificial valve. Aortic valve replacement has prolonged and improved his life. Carlos’ positive care experience with our team not only helped ease the pain—it helped him regain a positive outlook on life.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

No Barriers

Felix Sockwell
+
Tom Henry

Heart attack defeated. Healthy life won.

The Art

When Tom started to feel intense pain in his chest and left arm, he knew he was having a heart attack. We performed an angioplasty and placed a stent to open an artery that was 100% blocked. Today, Tom feels 100% better, maximizing family time and minimizing stress. Every heart is different, and he urges friends to know the signs of a heart attack.

Before his heart attack, Tom had planned a ski trip with his family. Just one month after treatment, Tom was cleared by his care team to move forward with his plans. Felix Sockwell created a single-line portrait of Tom to illustrate the two sides of his journey: from being in a hospital bed to being back out on the slopes.

The Science

During angioplasty, we inflated and deflated a tiny balloon in Tom’s clogged artery to widen it. We then placed a stent inside the artery to help prop it open and decrease the chance of it narrowing again.

Tom’s care team helped him feel comfortable through every step of his treatment. Despite his heart attack and a family history of heart disease, Tom experienced no permanent damage to his heart. He understands the importance of heart health awareness and listening to your body, knowing that heart attack signs and symptoms are different for everyone.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Supported

Brent McMahan
+
Sibyl Sifflet

Two organ transplants. One trusted team.

The Art

After battling heart and kidney disease for years, Sibyl conquered both. After receiving a heart transplant, Sibyl now focuses on exercising, eating better and spending quality time with family. She’s back to the job she loves and shares her positive outlook with other transplant patients, helping them focus on their journey to better health.

Brent McMahan crafted a mixed media sculpture that displays Sibyl’s joyful heart, proudly supported by our team.

The Science

Our team of heart transplant specialists knows just how debilitating advanced heart failure can be. The ability to receive a heart transplant soon after being listed is optimal, as it can make a big difference in your quality of life.

After her transplant, Sibyl had the opportunity to hold her old heart through our Heart-to-Heart program. The program encourages transplant patients to lead a healthier lifestyle after they see the damage to their old heart. After living with breathlessness and other heart failure symptoms for years, Sibyl now enjoys a whole new life.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

One of a Kind

Laragh Gallagher
+
Heidi Easley

Second opinion. A Texas first.*

The Art

After Heidi was diagnosed with migraine and had a mini stroke, she came to us for a second opinion—and learned she had a hole in her heart known as a patent foramen ovale (PFO). She became the first Texas patient to receive the lifesaving PFO Occluder. Today, Heidi is growing her own business, enjoying her family and living without limits.

After learning that Heidi is a painter who uses art as a form of healing, Laragh Gallagher found a way to honor Heidi’s recovery and her style of art. She painted a portrait of Heidi using patterns and brushwork that matched Heidi’s personal style, with both eyes surrounded by hearts. Each heart featured a small loop at its center, symbolizing the hole repaired by our care team.

The Science

The PFO, present in the heart of every developing fetus, typically closes after birth. But that was not the case for Heidi. While many people with a PFO never experience symptoms or complications, the condition can potentially allow dangerous clots to travel up to the brain and cause a stroke. The PFO Occluder device we placed closed the hole in Heidi’s heart and reduced her risk of having recurrent strokes.

Today, Heidi feels at ease, knowing her risk of having more strokes is low. She sees her diet as a form of medicine. She eats healthier foods that make her feel good, and she enjoys all of her normal activities. She believes it’s important to move forward—to believe in the power of healing and live life to its fullest.

*Heidi was the first patient to receive this device that had been in clinical trials prior to her procedure.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Trust & Glory

Terri Stone
+
Karla Jefferson

Cardiac rehabilitation. Recovery in motion.

The Art

When Karla came to see us, she couldn’t walk around the block without getting winded. Our amazing care team treated her heart disease with quadruple bypass surgery called coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), followed by cardiac rehabilitation. Today, Karla can walk more than two miles and is energized by a healthier version of herself.

Terri Stone, inspired by Karla’s renewed zest for life, created a sculpture reflecting the fluid motion of a beating heart. The rounded shapes represent a healthy heart as it continuously pumps blood through the circulatory system.

The Science

CABG surgery improves blood flow to the heart after your coronary arteries become narrowed or blocked. The grafts used for CABG typically come from your own healthy arteries and veins. We performed CABG surgery on Karla to relieve chest pain and shortness of breath—symptoms that are common with heart disease. The surgery also lowered her risk of having a heart attack or other heart problems.

After surgery, Karla voluntarily entered a cardiac rehabilitation program. She wanted to be better than ever before. She kept things light for herself and other patients, “racing” them on the stationary bicycles to symbolize that anyone who takes a step toward getting better is winning. Today, she exercises more, enjoys healthier versions of her favorite foods and shares her story to raise awareness about the importance of a healthy heart.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

A Grateful
Heart

Jon Flaming
+
Tim Gallagher

Lifesaving heart transplant. Lifegiving impact.

The Art

After experiencing a widowmaker heart attack in his own home, Tim needed a heart transplant. Quick action by his family and our medical team, along with the right donor organ, saved his life.

When Jon Flaming spoke with Tim, he was inspired by Tim's gratitude for the quick, expert care he received. Putting brush to canvas, Jon illustrated the magnitude of the donor's gift and the care that our team delivers to every grateful heart we're honored to serve.

The Science

Heart transplants are not customary for most heart attack victims, but with Tim's condition rapidly deteriorating, his wife asked our care team for a second opinion. Tim was transported to Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, where our team confirmed he needed a new heart.

Due to a typically shorter wait time for our transplant patients, we were able to provide the right donor heart for Tim at the right time. Tim knows he was lucky. And today, his mission is to spread awareness about heart disease and the importance of a healthy lifestyle.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Legacy

Giovanni Valderas
+
Kay Nell Harris

Minimally invasive heart surgery. Major benefits.

The Art

When we detected a problem with Kay's heart through medical tests, we helped her find the right solution. She received TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement), a minimally invasive alternative to open heart surgery. She was out of the hospital and back home the next day.

When Giovanni Valderas spoke with Kay, he was drawn to her warm-hearted nature and connection to family. He sculpted a magnolia, Kay's favorite tree, using reclaimed wood to show how roots take hold around the human heart and give it life.

The Science

TAVR, which replaces the main heart valve with an artificial valve, is available to a wide range of patients today. Innovative therapies like TAVR are introduced through clinical trials, where researchers evaluate a new treatment against the standard treatment. When Kay needed the procedure, it was still in clinical trials.

Traditional open heart surgery typically lasts 4 hours with a 7-day hospital stay, while TAVR lasts 30-45 minutes and patients often go home the next day. Since the first clinical trials in 2007, we've been national leaders in TAVR. Our commitment to research is just one of the ways we provide innovative care for patients. Kay was thrilled to receive this minimally invasive treatment and quickly get back to what she loves.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Precision

Raynor Bearden
+
Elizabeth Turner

Irregular heartbeat. Elevated heart care.

The Art

When Elizabeth’s smartwatch detected an irregular heart rate, her doctor detected something bigger: a serious heart condition known as atrial fibrillation (AFib). Early diagnosis helped us provide Elizabeth with a minimally invasive surgery that corrected her irregular heartbeat and helped her get back to the activities she loves.

Raynor Bearden, inspired by Elizabeth’s vibrant nature, used a meticulous cross-hatching technique that mimics the marks of treatment for AFib. Raynor created 16 different hearts to mirror the number of app icons on Elizabeth’s smartwatch while also illustrating how every heart we treat is unique.

The Science

People with AFib might experience a number of symptoms, including a rapid heart rate, shortness of breath and fatigue. It’s important to get treatment for AFib, which comes with an increased risk of stroke. During treatment, we put lines of scar tissue into Elizabeth’s heart, similar to a cornfield maze. This caused the electrical system of her heart to correct, helping her get out of AFib and off medication.

Elizabeth’s symptoms of AFib are long gone, and so is her likelihood of a stroke. She credits her care team for helping her quickly get back to dancing, an activity dear to her heart.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Continuum

Gil Bruvel
+
Bob Torti

Heart disease halted. Recovery enhanced.

The Art

Despite having no symptoms of heart disease, Bob decided to get a CT scan of his heart. The test revealed an aortic aneurysm, a serious heart condition that can be fatal if it ruptures. We repaired Bob’s aneurysm and enhanced his recovery with a cardiac rehab plan. After treatment, Bob was so energized that he came out of retirement to begin a new job that he loves.

Gil Bruvel, inspired by Bob’s determination to regain his health, created an angelic figure that represents our team’s commitment to Bob’s recovery. Gil used pixelated pieces of wood and color to represent the growth of recovery and the rejuvenation of life.

The Science

A calcium score screening detects build-up in the coronary arteries that could increase your risk of a heart attack. Depending on your test results, your doctor might suggest medication or lifestyle changes.

After repairing Bob’s aortic aneurysm, we enrolled him in our cardiac rehabilitation program. Cardiac rehabilitation typically lasts 12 weeks, with medically supervised sessions that cover lifestyle changes in exercise, nutrition, stress management and smoking cessation. Bob eagerly embraced participation in the program, incorporating real-life strategies into his recovery to gain the confidence needed to get back on his feet.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Heart + Life

Arthur James
+
Carlos Hernandez

Heart disease halted. Recovery enhanced.

The Art

When Carlos started feeling short of breath, it was time to find a longtime solution. We replaced his aortic valve, which was leaking badly, and helped renew his zest for life. Carlos, who has lived in many states but calls Texas home, is now back to work, spending time with family and enjoying newfound energy.

Arthur James, inspired by the many treasures Carlos keeps in his heart, collected unique elements and symbols to create a mosaic of his restoration and renewal.

The Science

The main test for diagnosing heart valve diseases is an echocardiogram (echo)—an ultrasound that helps your care team evaluate how well your heart is pumping.

We replaced Carlos’ main heart valve with an artificial valve. Aortic valve replacement has prolonged and improved his life. Carlos’ positive care experience with our team not only helped ease the pain—it helped him regain a positive outlook on life.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

No Barriers

Felix Sockwell
+
Tom Henry

Heart attack defeated. Healthy life won.

The Art

When Tom started to feel intense pain in his chest and left arm, he knew he was having a heart attack. We performed an angioplasty and placed a stent to open an artery that was 100% blocked. Today, Tom feels 100% better, maximizing family time and minimizing stress. Every heart is different, and he urges friends to know the signs of a heart attack.

Before his heart attack, Tom had planned a ski trip with his family. Just one month after treatment, Tom was cleared by his care team to move forward with his plans. Felix Sockwell created a single-line portrait of Tom to illustrate the two sides of his journey: from being in a hospital bed to being back out on the slopes.

The Science

During angioplasty, we inflated and deflated a tiny balloon in Tom’s clogged artery to widen it. We then placed a stent inside the artery to help prop it open and decrease the chance of it narrowing again.

Tom’s care team helped him feel comfortable through every step of his treatment. Despite his heart attack and a family history of heart disease, Tom experienced no permanent damage to his heart. He understands the importance of heart health awareness and listening to your body, knowing that heart attack signs and symptoms are different for everyone.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Supported

Brent McMahan
+
Sibyl Sifflet

Two organ transplants. One trusted team.

The Art

After battling heart and kidney disease for years, Sibyl conquered both. After receiving a heart transplant, Sibyl now focuses on exercising, eating better and spending quality time with family. She’s back to the job she loves and shares her positive outlook with other transplant patients, helping them focus on their journey to better health.

Brent McMahan crafted a mixed media sculpture that displays Sibyl’s joyful heart, proudly supported by our team.

The Science

Our team of heart transplant specialists knows just how debilitating advanced heart failure can be. The ability to receive a heart transplant soon after being listed is optimal, as it can make a big difference in your quality of life.

After her transplant, Sibyl had the opportunity to hold her old heart through our Heart-to-Heart program. The program encourages transplant patients to lead a healthier lifestyle after they see the damage to their old heart. After living with breathlessness and other heart failure symptoms for years, Sibyl now enjoys a whole new life.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

One of a Kind

Laragh Gallagher
+
Heidi Easley

Second opinion. A Texas first.*

The Art

After Heidi was diagnosed with migraine and had a mini stroke, she came to us for a second opinion—and learned she had a hole in her heart known as a patent foramen ovale (PFO). She became the first Texas patient to receive the lifesaving PFO Occluder. Today, Heidi is growing her own business, enjoying her family and living without limits.

After learning that Heidi is a painter who uses art as a form of healing, Laragh Gallagher found a way to honor Heidi’s recovery and her style of art. She painted a portrait of Heidi using patterns and brushwork that matched Heidi’s personal style, with both eyes surrounded by hearts. Each heart featured a small loop at its center, symbolizing the hole repaired by our care team.

The Science

The PFO, present in the heart of every developing fetus, typically closes after birth. But that was not the case for Heidi. While many people with a PFO never experience symptoms or complications, the condition can potentially allow dangerous clots to travel up to the brain and cause a stroke. The PFO Occluder device we placed closed the hole in Heidi’s heart and reduced her risk of having recurrent strokes.

Today, Heidi feels at ease, knowing her risk of having more strokes is low. She sees her diet as a form of medicine. She eats healthier foods that make her feel good, and she enjoys all of her normal activities. She believes it’s important to move forward—to believe in the power of healing and live life to its fullest.

*Heidi was the first patient to receive this device that had been in clinical trials prior to her procedure.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Trust & Glory

Terri Stone
+
Karla Jefferson

Cardiac rehabilitation. Recovery in motion.

The Art

When Karla came to see us, she couldn’t walk around the block without getting winded. Our amazing care team treated her heart disease with quadruple bypass surgery called coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), followed by cardiac rehabilitation. Today, Karla can walk more than two miles and is energized by a healthier version of herself.

Terri Stone, inspired by Karla’s renewed zest for life, created a sculpture reflecting the fluid motion of a beating heart. The rounded shapes represent a healthy heart as it continuously pumps blood through the circulatory system.

The Science

CABG surgery improves blood flow to the heart after your coronary arteries become narrowed or blocked. The grafts used for CABG typically come from your own healthy arteries and veins. We performed CABG surgery on Karla to relieve chest pain and shortness of breath—symptoms that are common with heart disease. The surgery also lowered her risk of having a heart attack or other heart problems.

After surgery, Karla voluntarily entered a cardiac rehabilitation program. She wanted to be better than ever before. She kept things light for herself and other patients, “racing” them on the stationary bicycles to symbolize that anyone who takes a step toward getting better is winning. Today, she exercises more, enjoys healthier versions of her favorite foods and shares her story to raise awareness about the importance of a healthy heart.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

A Grateful
Heart

Jon Flaming
+
Tim Gallagher

Lifesaving heart transplant. Lifegiving impact.

The Art

After experiencing a widowmaker heart attack in his own home, Tim needed a heart transplant. Quick action by his family and our medical team, along with the right donor organ, saved his life.

When Jon Flaming spoke with Tim, he was inspired by Tim's gratitude for the quick, expert care he received. Putting brush to canvas, Jon illustrated the magnitude of the donor's gift and the care that our team delivers to every grateful heart we're honored to serve.

The Science

Heart transplants are not customary for most heart attack victims, but with Tim's condition rapidly deteriorating, his wife asked our care team for a second opinion. Tim was transported to Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, where our team confirmed he needed a new heart.

Due to a typically shorter wait time for our transplant patients, we were able to provide the right donor heart for Tim at the right time. Tim knows he was lucky. And today, his mission is to spread awareness about heart disease and the importance of a healthy lifestyle.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Legacy

Giovanni Valderas
+
Kay Nell Harris

Minimally invasive heart surgery. Major benefits.

The Art

When we detected a problem with Kay's heart through medical tests, we helped her find the right solution. She received TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement), a minimally invasive alternative to open heart surgery. She was out of the hospital and back home the next day.

When Giovanni Valderas spoke with Kay, he was drawn to her warm-hearted nature and connection to family. He sculpted a magnolia, Kay's favorite tree, using reclaimed wood to show how roots take hold around the human heart and give it life.

The Science

TAVR, which replaces the main heart valve with an artificial valve, is available to a wide range of patients today. Innovative therapies like TAVR are introduced through clinical trials, where researchers evaluate a new treatment against the standard treatment. When Kay needed the procedure, it was still in clinical trials.

Traditional open heart surgery typically lasts 4 hours with a 7-day hospital stay, while TAVR lasts 30-45 minutes and patients often go home the next day. Since the first clinical trials in 2007, we've been national leaders in TAVR. Our commitment to research is just one of the ways we provide innovative care for patients. Kay was thrilled to receive this minimally invasive treatment and quickly get back to what she loves.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Precision

Raynor Bearden
+
Elizabeth Turner

Irregular heartbeat. Elevated heart care.

The Art

When Elizabeth’s smartwatch detected an irregular heart rate, her doctor detected something bigger: a serious heart condition known as atrial fibrillation (AFib). Early diagnosis helped us provide Elizabeth with a minimally invasive surgery that corrected her irregular heartbeat and helped her get back to the activities she loves.

Raynor Bearden, inspired by Elizabeth’s vibrant nature, used a meticulous cross-hatching technique that mimics the marks of treatment for AFib. Raynor created 16 different hearts to mirror the number of app icons on Elizabeth’s smartwatch while also illustrating how every heart we treat is unique.

The Science

People with AFib might experience a number of symptoms, including a rapid heart rate, shortness of breath and fatigue. It’s important to get treatment for AFib, which comes with an increased risk of stroke. During treatment, we put lines of scar tissue into Elizabeth’s heart, similar to a cornfield maze. This caused the electrical system of her heart to correct, helping her get out of AFib and off medication.

Elizabeth’s symptoms of AFib are long gone, and so is her likelihood of a stroke. She credits her care team for helping her quickly get back to dancing, an activity dear to her heart.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Continuum

Gil Bruvel
+
Bob Torti

Heart disease halted. Recovery enhanced.

The Art

Despite having no symptoms of heart disease, Bob decided to get a CT scan of his heart. The test revealed an aortic aneurysm, a serious heart condition that can be fatal if it ruptures. We repaired Bob’s aneurysm and enhanced his recovery with a cardiac rehab plan. After treatment, Bob was so energized that he came out of retirement to begin a new job that he loves.

Gil Bruvel, inspired by Bob’s determination to regain his health, created an angelic figure that represents our team’s commitment to Bob’s recovery. Gil used pixelated pieces of wood and color to represent the growth of recovery and the rejuvenation of life.

The Science

A calcium score screening detects build-up in the coronary arteries that could increase your risk of a heart attack. Depending on your test results, your doctor might suggest medication or lifestyle changes.

After repairing Bob’s aortic aneurysm, we enrolled him in our cardiac rehabilitation program. Cardiac rehabilitation typically lasts 12 weeks, with medically supervised sessions that cover lifestyle changes in exercise, nutrition, stress management and smoking cessation. Bob eagerly embraced participation in the program, incorporating real-life strategies into his recovery to gain the confidence needed to get back on his feet.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Heart + Life

Arthur James
+
Carlos Hernandez

Heart disease halted. Recovery enhanced.

The Art

When Carlos started feeling short of breath, it was time to find a longtime solution. We replaced his aortic valve, which was leaking badly, and helped renew his zest for life. Carlos, who has lived in many states but calls Texas home, is now back to work, spending time with family and enjoying newfound energy.

Arthur James, inspired by the many treasures Carlos keeps in his heart, collected unique elements and symbols to create a mosaic of his restoration and renewal.

The Science

The main test for diagnosing heart valve diseases is an echocardiogram (echo)—an ultrasound that helps your care team evaluate how well your heart is pumping.

We replaced Carlos’ main heart valve with an artificial valve. Aortic valve replacement has prolonged and improved his life. Carlos’ positive care experience with our team not only helped ease the pain—it helped him regain a positive outlook on life.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

No Barriers

Felix Sockwell
+
Tom Henry

Heart attack defeated. Healthy life won.

The Art

When Tom started to feel intense pain in his chest and left arm, he knew he was having a heart attack. We performed an angioplasty and placed a stent to open an artery that was 100% blocked. Today, Tom feels 100% better, maximizing family time and minimizing stress. Every heart is different, and he urges friends to know the signs of a heart attack.

Before his heart attack, Tom had planned a ski trip with his family. Just one month after treatment, Tom was cleared by his care team to move forward with his plans. Felix Sockwell created a single-line portrait of Tom to illustrate the two sides of his journey: from being in a hospital bed to being back out on the slopes.

The Science

During angioplasty, we inflated and deflated a tiny balloon in Tom’s clogged artery to widen it. We then placed a stent inside the artery to help prop it open and decrease the chance of it narrowing again.

Tom’s care team helped him feel comfortable through every step of his treatment. Despite his heart attack and a family history of heart disease, Tom experienced no permanent damage to his heart. He understands the importance of heart health awareness and listening to your body, knowing that heart attack signs and symptoms are different for everyone.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Supported

Brent McMahan
+
Sibyl Sifflet

Two organ transplants. One trusted team.

The Art

After battling heart and kidney disease for years, Sibyl conquered both. After receiving a heart transplant, Sibyl now focuses on exercising, eating better and spending quality time with family. She’s back to the job she loves and shares her positive outlook with other transplant patients, helping them focus on their journey to better health.

Brent McMahan crafted a mixed media sculpture that displays Sibyl’s joyful heart, proudly supported by our team.

The Science

Our team of heart transplant specialists knows just how debilitating advanced heart failure can be. The ability to receive a heart transplant soon after being listed is optimal, as it can make a big difference in your quality of life.

After her transplant, Sibyl had the opportunity to hold her old heart through our Heart-to-Heart program. The program encourages transplant patients to lead a healthier lifestyle after they see the damage to their old heart. After living with breathlessness and other heart failure symptoms for years, Sibyl now enjoys a whole new life.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

One of a Kind

Laragh Gallagher
+
Heidi Easley

Second opinion. A Texas first.*

The Art

After Heidi was diagnosed with migraine and had a mini stroke, she came to us for a second opinion—and learned she had a hole in her heart known as a patent foramen ovale (PFO). She became the first Texas patient to receive the lifesaving PFO Occluder. Today, Heidi is growing her own business, enjoying her family and living without limits.

After learning that Heidi is a painter who uses art as a form of healing, Laragh Gallagher found a way to honor Heidi’s recovery and her style of art. She painted a portrait of Heidi using patterns and brushwork that matched Heidi’s personal style, with both eyes surrounded by hearts. Each heart featured a small loop at its center, symbolizing the hole repaired by our care team.

The Science

The PFO, present in the heart of every developing fetus, typically closes after birth. But that was not the case for Heidi. While many people with a PFO never experience symptoms or complications, the condition can potentially allow dangerous clots to travel up to the brain and cause a stroke. The PFO Occluder device we placed closed the hole in Heidi’s heart and reduced her risk of having recurrent strokes.

Today, Heidi feels at ease, knowing her risk of having more strokes is low. She sees her diet as a form of medicine. She eats healthier foods that make her feel good, and she enjoys all of her normal activities. She believes it’s important to move forward—to believe in the power of healing and live life to its fullest.

*Heidi was the first patient to receive this device that had been in clinical trials prior to her procedure.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

Trust & Glory

Terri Stone
+
Karla Jefferson

Cardiac rehabilitation. Recovery in motion.

The Art

When Karla came to see us, she couldn’t walk around the block without getting winded. Our amazing care team treated her heart disease with quadruple bypass surgery called coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), followed by cardiac rehabilitation. Today, Karla can walk more than two miles and is energized by a healthier version of herself.

Terri Stone, inspired by Karla’s renewed zest for life, created a sculpture reflecting the fluid motion of a beating heart. The rounded shapes represent a healthy heart as it continuously pumps blood through the circulatory system.

The Science

CABG surgery improves blood flow to the heart after your coronary arteries become narrowed or blocked. The grafts used for CABG typically come from your own healthy arteries and veins. We performed CABG surgery on Karla to relieve chest pain and shortness of breath—symptoms that are common with heart disease. The surgery also lowered her risk of having a heart attack or other heart problems.

After surgery, Karla voluntarily entered a cardiac rehabilitation program. She wanted to be better than ever before. She kept things light for herself and other patients, “racing” them on the stationary bicycles to symbolize that anyone who takes a step toward getting better is winning. Today, she exercises more, enjoys healthier versions of her favorite foods and shares her story to raise awareness about the importance of a healthy heart.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

© Baylor Scott & White Health. All Rights Reserved.

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